A journal of my experiences with breast cancer to inform those who are interested and to help any one else who might have just been diagnosed.

“[She] will have no fear of bad news; [her] heart is steadfast, trusting in the Lord.” Psalm 112:7

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Cancer Fighting Kitchen: Onions and a recipe for Red Onion Soup

Onions' sulfur compounds and flavonoids may help fend off several forms of cancer. These powerful antioxidant compounds also help fight some of the side effects of high blood sugar, not to mention heart disease. Onions even seem to boost HDL, or the "good" cholesterol. Evidence suggests that onions may help preserve bone and prevent osteoporosis, and because  the sulfur compounds are strongly anti-inflammatory, onions may also relieve the pain and swelling of arthritis. Finally, onions are one of the richest sources of chromium, a mineral that improves the body's ability to respond to insulin. Onions have very few calories, so add them cooked or raw to as many dishes as you can think of. Minced raw onions have the greatest health benefits. A serving is usually considered to be 1/4 cup at a time.
Here is a list of onions and their cousins, ranked from highest to lowest level of antioxidants:
shallots
Western yellow
Northern red
Empire sweet
Western white
Imperial Valley sweet
Vidalia

Here is a recipe for Red Onion Soup to get you started.

Red Onion Soup

French Red Onion Soup
source
3 Tab. olive oil
6 large red onions, sliced
pinch salt
2 tea. fresh thyme (or 1 tea. dried thyme) or 2 tea. fresh marjoram
1 cup red wine
6 cups vegetable broth
pinch of nutmeg

In a large pot, heat the oil and add onions and salt and stir. Cook on med-low heat for 25 minutes to caramelize. When the onions have turned a deep golden brown. Stir in the herbs and deglaze with the wine. Add broth and nutmeg and simmer 15 minutes.

If desired, you may serve with Parmesan Crostini floating on top the soup.
Slice a baguette into 1/4 inch rounds and place on a baking sheet. Brush the top of each slice with olive oil and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake 350 oven until lightly toasted and cheese has melted.

Source: modified slightly from the recipe at One Bite at a Time, Rebecca Katz; Magic Foods, by Robert Barnett, Christine Pelkman and Denise Webb

3 comments:

  1. I would think it has a very strong flavor because I know raw red onion is amazingly strong in a recipe and a little bit goes a long way.

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    Replies
    1. Actually, onions once they are cooked for a certain length of time, caramelize and become very sweet. It doesn't have a strong "onion" flavor at all.

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  2. Great information! Good reminder to eat more of this amazing root veggie. We love thick slices cooked on the bbq, Another favorite is frying onion, garlic, and mushrooms as a side dish.

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